KeyPass v2.5.3 by RiSE serial key or number

KeyPass v2.5.3 by RiSE serial key or number

KeyPass v2.5.3 by RiSE serial key or number

KeyPass v2.5.3 by RiSE serial key or number

Preface

 Identity Management

This section shows how to create, read, update, delete, and list identities using the RESTful APIs.

AM has the , , and JSON-based APIs for managing identities. These APIs follow the ForgeRock common REST pattern for creating, reading, updating, deleting, and querying resources.

Examples in this section do not repeat the authentication shown in "Authentication and Logout using REST". For browser-based clients, you can rely on AM cookies rather than construct the header in your application. Managing agent profiles, groups, and users with these APIs requires authentication. The examples shown in this section were performed with the token ID gained after authenticating as an AM administrator, for example .

Although the examples here show user management, you can use and in similar fashion. See "Realm Management" for examples related to realms.

The following sections cover this JSON-based API:

 Creating Identities using the REST API

AM lets administrators create a user profile with an HTTP POST of the JSON representation of the profile to . To add a user to the Top Level Realm, you do not need to specify the realm.

The following example shows an administrator creating a new user. The only required fields are and . If no other name is provided, the entry you make for defaults to both the user id and the user's last name:

$ curl \ --request POST \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --data \ '{ "username": "bjensen", "userpassword": "secret12", "mail": "bjensen@www.mkwebhost.com" }' \ www.mkwebhost.com?_action=create{ "_id": "bjensen", "_rev": "", "username": "bjensen", "realm": "/", "uid": [ "bjensen" ], "mail": [ "bjensen@www.mkwebhost.com" ], "universalid": [ "id=bjensen,ou=user,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "objectClass": [ "iplanet-am-managed-person", "inetuser", "sunFederationManagerDataStore", "sunFMSAML2NameIdentifier", "inetorgperson", "sunIdentityServerLibertyPPService", "devicePrintProfilesContainer", "iplanet-am-user-service", "iPlanetPreferences", "pushDeviceProfilesContainer", "forgerock-am-dashboard-service", "organizationalperson", "top", "kbaInfoContainer", "person", "sunAMAuthAccountLockout", "oathDeviceProfilesContainer", "iplanet-am-auth-configuration-service" ], "inetUserStatus": [ "Active" ], "dn": [ "uid=bjensen,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "cn": [ "bjensen" ], "sn": [ "bjensen" ], "createTimestamp": [ "Z" ] }

Alternatively, administrators can create user profiles with specific user IDs by doing an HTTP PUT of the JSON representation of the changes to , as shown in the following example:

$ curl \ --request PUT \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --header "If-None-Match: *" \ --data \ '{ "username": "janedoe", "userpassword": "secret12", "mail": "janedoe@www.mkwebhost.com" }' \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "_id": "janedoe", "_rev": "", "username": "janedoe", "realm": "/", "uid": [ "janedoe" ], "mail": [ "janedoe@www.mkwebhost.com" ], "universalid": [ "id=janedoe,ou=user,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "objectClass": [ "iplanet-am-managed-person", "inetuser", "sunFederationManagerDataStore", "sunFMSAML2NameIdentifier", "inetorgperson", "sunIdentityServerLibertyPPService", "devicePrintProfilesContainer", "iplanet-am-user-service", "iPlanetPreferences", "pushDeviceProfilesContainer", "forgerock-am-dashboard-service", "organizationalperson", "top", "kbaInfoContainer", "person", "sunAMAuthAccountLockout", "oathDeviceProfilesContainer", "iplanet-am-auth-configuration-service" ], "dn": [ "uid=janedoe,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "inetUserStatus": [ "Active" ], "cn": [ "janedoe" ], "sn": [ "janedoe" ], "createTimestamp": [ "Z" ] }

As shown in the examples, AM returns the JSON representation of the profile on successful creation. On failure, AM returns a JSON representation of the error including the HTTP status code. For example, version of the CREST , , and endpoints return if the user making the request is not authorized to do so.

The same HTTP POST and PUT mechanisms also work for other objects, such as web or Java agent profiles and groups:

$ curl \ --request POST \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --data \ '{ "username":"myAgent", "www.mkwebhost.comt":[ "www.mkwebhost.com" ], "www.mkwebhost.comon":[ "centralized" ], "agenttype":[ "WebAgent" ], "serverurl":[ "www.mkwebhost.com" ], "agenturl":[ "www.mkwebhost.com" ], "userpassword":[ "password" ], "www.mkwebhost.com":[ "[0]=www.mkwebhost.com?realm=/#login" ], "www.mkwebhost.com":[ "[0]=www.mkwebhost.com?realm=/#logout" ], "sunidentityserverdevicestatus":[ "Active" ] }' \ www.mkwebhost.com?_action=create { "username": "myAgent", "realm": "/", "www.mkwebhost.comt": [ "www.mkwebhost.com" ], "www.mkwebhost.comon": [ "centralized" ], "AgentType": [ "WebAgent" ], "userpassword": [ "{SHA-1}W6ph5Mm5Pz8GgiULbPgzG37mj9g=" ], "www.mkwebhost.com": [ "[0]=www.mkwebhost.com?realm=/#login" ], "www.mkwebhost.com": ["[0]=www.mkwebhost.com?realm=/#logout" ], "sunIdentityServerDeviceStatus": [ "Active" ] }

The command output above has been truncated to be more readable. When you create an agent profile, AM returns the full profile in JSON format.

$ curl \ --request POST \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: resource=" \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --data '{ "username":"newGroup" }' \ www.mkwebhost.com?_action=create{ "username":"newGroup", "realm":"/", "uniqueMember":[ "uid=demo,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "cn":[ "newGroup" ], "dn":[ "cn=newGroup,ou=groups,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "objectclass":[ "groupofuniquenames", "top" ], "universalid":[ "id=newGroup,ou=group,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ] }$ curl \ --request PUT \ --header "If-None-Match: *" \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --data '{ "username":"anotherGroup", "uniquemember":["uid=demo,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org"] }' \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "username":"anotherGroup", "realm":"/", "uniqueMember":[ "uid=demo,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "cn":[ "anotherGroup" ], "dn":[ "cn=anotherGroup,ou=groups,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "objectclass":[ "groupofuniquenames", "top" ], "universalid":[ "id=anotherGroup,ou=group,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ] }

 Reading Identities using the REST API

AM lets users and administrators read profiles by requesting an HTTP GET on . This allows users and administrators to verify user data, status, and directory. If users or administrators see missing or incorrect information, they can write down the correct information and add it using "Updating Identities using the REST API". To read a profile on the Top Level Realm, you do not need to specify the realm.

Users can review the data associated with their own accounts, and administrators can also read other user's profiles.

If an administrator user is reading their own profile, an additional element, with a value of is returned in the JSON response. The XUI verifies this element to grant or deny access to the AM Console.

The following example shows an administrator accessing user data belonging to :

$ curl \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ www.mkwebhost.com

Use the query string parameter to restrict the list of attributes returned. This parameter takes a comma-separated list of JSON object fields to include in the result:

$ curl \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ www.mkwebhost.com?_fields=username,uid{ "username":"demo", "uid":[ "demo" ] }

As shown in the examples, AM returns the JSON representation of the profile on success. On failure, AM returns a JSON representation of the error including the HTTP status code.

Using HTTP GET to read also works for other objects such as agent profiles and groups:

$ curl \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "username":"myAgent", "realm":"/", "www.mkwebhost.comt":[ "www.mkwebhost.com" ], "www.mkwebhost.comon":[ "centralized" ], "AgentType":[ "WebAgent" ], "userpassword":[ "{SHA-1}W6ph5Mm5Pz8GgiULbPgzG37mj9g=" ], "www.mkwebhost.com":[ "[0]=www.mkwebhost.com?realm=/#login" ], "www.mkwebhost.com":[ "[0]=www.mkwebhost.com?realm=/#logout" ], "sunIdentityServerDeviceStatus":[ "Active" ] }

The command output above has been truncated to be more readable. When you read an agent profile, AM returns the full profile in JSON format.

Append the query string parameter to make the returned JSON easier to read.

 Updating Identities using the REST API

AM lets users update their own profiles, and lets administrators update other users' profiles. To update an identity do an HTTP PUT of the JSON representation of the changes to . To update a profile on the Top Level Realm, you do not need to specify the realm.

The following example shows how users can update their own profiles:

$ curl \ --request PUT \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQICY3MTAx*" \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "If-Match: *" \ --data '{ "mail": "demo@www.mkwebhost.com" }' \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "username":"demo", "realm":"/", "uid":[ "demo" ], "mail":[ "demo@example.

As shown in the example, AM returns the JSON representation of the profile on success. On failure, AM returns a JSON representation of the error including the HTTP status code.

You can use HTTP PUT to update other objects as well, such as web or Java agent profiles and groups.

The following example updates a web agent profile:

$ curl \ --request PUT \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQICY3MTAx*" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "If-Match: *" \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --data '{ "sunIdentityServerDeviceStatus" : [ "Inactive" ] }' \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "username":"myAgent", "realm":"/", "www.mkwebhost.comt":[ "www.mkwebhost.com" ], "www.mkwebhost.comon":[ "centralized" ], "AgentType":[ "WebAgent" ], "userpassword":[ "{SHA-1}W6ph5Mm5Pz8GgiULbPgzG37mj9g=" ], "www.mkwebhost.com":[ "[0]=www.mkwebhost.com?realm=/#login" ], "www.mkwebhost.com":[ "[0]=www.mkwebhost.com?realm=/#logout" ], "sunIdentityServerDeviceStatus":[ "Inactive" ] }

The command output above has been truncated to be more readable. When you update an agent profile, AM returns the full profile in JSON format.

Notice in the following example, which updates , the object class value is not included in the JSON sent to AM:

$ curl \ --request PUT \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQICY3MTAx*" \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --data '{ "uniquemember":[ "uid=newUser,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org", "uid=demo,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ] }' \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "name":"newGroup", "realm":"/", "uniqueMember":[ "uid=newUser,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org", "uid=demo,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "cn":[ "newGroup" ], "dn":[ "cn=newGroup,ou=groups,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "objectclass":[ "groupofuniquenames", "top" ], "universalid":[ "id=newGroup,ou=group,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ] }

 Deleting Identities using the REST API

AM lets administrators delete a user profile by making an HTTP DELETE call to . To delete a user from the Top Level Realm, you do not need to specify the realm.

The following example removes a user from the top level realm. Only administrators should delete users. The user id is the only field required to delete a user:

$ curl \ --request DELETE \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "_id": "bjensen", "_rev": "", "success": "true" }

On success, AM returns a JSON object indicating success. On failure, AM returns a JSON representation of the error including the HTTP status code.

You can use this same logic for other resources such as performing an HTTP DELETE of an agent profile or of a group:

$ curl \ --request DELETE \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "_id": "myOAuth2ClientAgent", "_rev": "", "success": "true" }$ curl \ --request DELETE \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: resource=" \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "success":"true" }

Deleting a user does not automatically remove any of the user's sessions. If you are using CTS-based sessions, you can remove a user's sessions by checking for any sessions for the user and then removing them using the console's Sessions page. If you are using client-based sessions, you cannot remove users' sessions; you must wait for the sessions to expire.

 Listing Identities using the REST API

AM lets administrators list identities by making an HTTP GET call to . To query the Top Level Realm, you do not need to specify the realm:

$ curl \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ "www.mkwebhost.com?_queryId=*"user@www.mkwebhost.com" }, "type":"salted-hash" } } }, { "questionId":"1", "answer":{ "$crypto":{ "value":{ "algorithm":"SHA", "data":"cfYYzi9UrVfFl0Tdw0iX" }, "type":"salted-hash" } } } ], "dn":[ "uid=demo,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "universalid":[ "id=demo,ou=user,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "modifyTimestamp":[ "Z" ] } ], "resultCount":2, "pagedResultsCookie":null, "totalPagedResultsPolicy":"NONE", "totalPagedResults", "remainingPagedResults" }

The endpoint also supports the parameter to alter the returned results. For more information, see "Query".

The parameter also works for other types of objects, such as agent profiles and groups:

$ curl \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ "www.mkwebhost.com?_queryId=*"{ "result":[ { "_id":"myAgent", "_rev":"", "username":"myAgent", "realm":"/" } ], "resultCount":1, "pagedResultsCookie":null, "remainingPagedResults" }$ curl \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: resource=" \ "www.mkwebhost.com?_queryId=*"{ "result" : [ "newGroup", "anotherGroup" ], "resultCount" : 2, "pagedResultsCookie" : null, "remainingPagedResults" : -1 }

As the result lists include all objects, this capability to list identity names is mainly useful in testing.

As shown in the examples, AM returns the JSON representation of the resource list if successful. On failure, AM returns a JSON representation of the error including the HTTP status code.

 Retrieving Identities Using the Session Cookie

If you only have access to the session cookie, you can retrieve the user ID by performing an HTTP POST operation on the endpoint using the action:

$ curl \ --verbose \ --request POST \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wM2LY4Sfczc5ODk4MjYzMzA2MQ..*" \ www.mkwebhost.com?_action=idFromSession{ "id":"demo", "realm":"/", "dn":"id=demo,ou=user,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org", "successURL":"/openam/console", "fullLoginURL":"/openam/UI/Login?realm=%2F" }

 Changing Passwords using the REST API

Users other than the top-level administrator can change their own passwords with an HTTP POST to including the new password as the value of in the request data.

Users must provide the current password, which is set in the request as the value of the .

For cases where users have forgotten their password, see "Retrieving Forgotten Usernames" in the User Self-Service Guide instead.

The following example shows a successful request to change the user's password to :

$ curl \ --request POST \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNTcy*" \ --data '{ "currentpassword":"changeit", "userpassword":"password" }' \ www.mkwebhost.com?_action=changePassword{}

On success, the response is an empty JSON object {} as shown in the example.

On failure, AM returns a JSON representation of the error including the HTTP status code. See also "HTTP Status Codes" for more information.

Administrators can change non-administrative users' passwords with an HTTP PUT to including the new password as the value of in the request data.

Unlike users, administrators do not provide users' current passwords when changing passwords.

The following example shows a successful request by an administrator to change the user's password to :

$ curl \ --request PUT \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNTcy*" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: protocol=,resource=" \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --data '{ "userpassword":"cangetin" }' \ www.mkwebhost.com{ "_id":"demo", "_rev":"", "username":"demo", "realm":"/", "uid":[ "demo" ], "mail":[ "demo@example.

As shown in the example, AM returns the JSON representation of the profile on success. On failure, AM returns a JSON representation of the error including the HTTP status code. See also "HTTP Status Codes" for more information.

 Creating Groups using the REST API

AM lets administrators create a group with an HTTP POST of the JSON representation of the group to the endpoint.

The following example shows how to create a group called in the top level realm using the REST API after authenticating to AM:

$ curl \ --request POST \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --header "Accept-API-Version: resource=" \ --header "iplanetDirectoryPro: AQIC5wNzEz*" \ --data '{ "username":"newGroup" }' \ www.mkwebhost.com?_action=create{ "username":"newGroup", "realm":"/", "uniqueMember":[ "uid=demo,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "cn":[ "newGroup" ], "dn":[ "cn=newGroup,ou=groups,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ], "objectclass":[ "groupofuniquenames", "top" ], "universalid":[ "id=newGroup,ou=group,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ] }

 Adding a User to a Group using the REST API

AM lets administrators add a user to an existing group with an HTTP PUT to the JSON representation of the group to the endpoint.

The following example shows how to add users to an existing group by using the REST API. The example assumes that the DS backend is in use. Make sure to use the attribute to specify the user using the DS server:

$ curl \ --request PUT \ --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: AQICY3MTAx*" \ --header "Content-Type: application/json" \ --data '{ "uniquemember":[ "uid=newUser,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org", "uid=demo,ou=people,dc=openam,dc=forgerock,dc=org" ] }' \ www.mkwebhost.com
Источник: [www.mkwebhost.com]
, KeyPass v2.5.3 by RiSE serial key or number

Synchronization








Merge changes made in multiple copies of a database.


Introduction and Requirements

KeePass 2.x features a powerful, built-in synchronization mechanism. Changes made in multiple copies of a database file can be merged safely.

After synchronizing two files A and B, both A and B are up-to-date (i.e. KeePass saves the merged data to both locations when performing a synchronization).

Requirements.

  • If the files to be synchronized are accessible via a protocol that KeePass supports by default (e.g. files on a local hard disk or a network share, FTP, HTTP/WebDAV, , see the page Loading/Saving From/To URL for details), then no plugins/extensions are required.
  • If one of the files to be synchronized should be accessed via SCP, SFTP or FTPS, you need the IOProtocolExt plugin, which adds support for these protocols to KeePass.
  • If one of the files to be synchronized is stored in an online storage (like e.g. Amazon's S3, DigitalBucket, ), you need an online storage provider plugin (e.g. KeeAnywhere, KeeCloud or KeePassSync). Note that you do not need a plugin in the other cases above (files on a local hard disk or network share, FTP, HTTP/WebDAV, SCP, SFTP, FTPS, ).

Invoking a Synchronization

There are multiple ways how a synchronization can be invoked:

  • Manually. A synchronization can be started manually by navigating to 'File''Synchronize' and clicking 'Synchronize with File' or 'Synchronize with URL' (depending on whether the file to be synchronized with is stored on a local drive / network share or on a server accessible via a URL). If you've previously opened or synchronized with the target file, you can also simply point on 'Recent Files' (in the 'Synchronize' menu) and select the file. Manual synchronization is only possible when the currently opened database is a local file (files on a network share are here considered to be local files); when you've opened a file from a server using a URL, the 'Synchronize' menu is disabled.
  • Command 'Save'. When invoking the 'Save' command, KeePass checks whether the file on disk/server has been modified while you were editing it. If it has been modified, KeePass prompts whether you want to overwrite or synchronize with the file. Note this applies only to the 'Save' command, not the 'Save As' command. See the page Multi-User for details (section 'KeePass 2.x: Synchronize or Overwrite').
  • Triggers. In more complex situations you can use the synchronization trigger action. See the page Triggers for details.
  • Scripting. In order to perform a synchronization without opening KeePass, the synchronization command of KPScript can be used. See the KPScript help page Single Command Operations for details.

Technical Details

The synchronization algorithm is rather complex and it would take many pages to describe in detail how it's working. Developers interested in this can have a look into the KeePass source code. Here are the most important properties of the synchronization algorithm:

  • In order to decide which copy of an object is the latest one, KeePass mainly uses the last modification time of the object (which KeePass updates automatically each time the object is changed).
  • The synchronization is performed on entry level. This e.g. means that a combination of user name / password is always consistent (synchronization on field level will not be implemented, because combinations could become inconsistent with this).
  • In case of parallel updates and collisions, KeePass tries to store all information in an appropriate place. For example, when you have an entry E in a database A, make a copy B of A, change E in B, change E in A, and synchronize A and B, then E in A is treated as current and the changes made to E in B are stored as a history version of E (see tab 'History' in the entry dialog), i.e. the changes made in B aren't lost.

Advanced Synchronization Schemes

  • Local↔Master Synchronization.
    A synchronization scheme that prevents data loss when database files are overwritten by other applications (e.g. cloud storage service software), using a trigger.
  • Plugins.
    There are plugins for more complex synchronization schemes, for example to synchronize only a subset of the entries.




Источник: [www.mkwebhost.com]
KeyPass v2.5.3 by RiSE serial key or number

Chapter 1. Threats to Directory Services

This chapter explains and demonstrates how to set up DS servers so as to minimize risk. Apply the suggestions in this chapter when you install DS servers for testing or production use.

In this chapter you will learn to:

  • Set up a special system account for the DS server

  • Protect access to server files

  • Enable only directory services that are actually used

  • Use appropriate log configuration

  • Use appropriate global access control settings

  • Use and store passwords appropriately

 Setting Up a System Account for a Server

Do not run DS servers as the system superuser (root). When applications run as superuser, the system effectively does not control their actions. When running the server as superuser, a bug in the server could affect other applications or the system itself.

After setting up a system account for the server, and using that account only to run the server, you can use system controls to limit user access.

The user running the server must have access to use the configured ports. Make sure you configure the system to let the user access privileged ports such as and if necessary. Make sure you configure the firewall to permit access to the server ports.

The user running the server must have access to all server files, including configuration files, data files, log files, keystores, truststores and their password files, and other files. By default, DS software lets users in the same group as the user running the server read server files, though not directory data files.

The user running the server does not, however, need access to login from a remote system or to perform actions unrelated to the directory service.

Set up the user account to prevent other users from reading configuration files. On UNIX, set an appropriate umask such as to prevent users in other groups from accessing server files. On Windows, use file access control to do the same. Do consider letting all users to run command-line tools. What a user can do with tools depends on server access control mechanisms. For details, see "Setting Appropriate File Permissions".

You can create a UNIX service script to start the server at system startup and stop the server at system shutdown by using the create-rc-script command. For details see "create-rc-script &#; script to manage OpenDJ as a service on UNIX" in the Reference.

You can use the windows-service command to register the DS server as a Windows service. For details, see "windows-service &#; register DS as a Windows Service" in the Reference.

 Protect DS Server Files

By default, DS servers do not encrypt server files or directory data. The only attribute values stored in encrypted or digest form are passwords. For instructions on encrypting entries and index content, see "Encrypting Directory Data" in the Administration Guide. For instructions on encrypting change log content, see "To Encrypt External Change Log Data" in the Administration Guide.

If you set up an appropriate user account for the server as described in "Setting Up a System Account for a Server", and unpacked the server files as that user, then the system should prevent other users from having overly permissive access to server files.

Included in the files that the server does not encrypt are LDIF exports of directory data. LDIF export files are readable and writable depending on the UNIX umask or Windows file access control settings for the user who runs the command to export the LDIF. The export-ldif command can compress the LDIF, but does not have an option for encrypting LDIF.

Directory backup archives can be encrypted, but are not encrypted by default. Backup archive file permissions depend on the UNIX umask or Windows file access control settings. When using the backup command, run an online backup and supply the option as shown in the following example:

$ backup \ --hostname www.mkwebhost.com \ --port \ --bindDN "cn=Directory Manager" \ --bindPassword - \ --backupAll \ --backupDirectory /path/to/opendj/bak \ --encrypt \ --start 0Password for user 'cn=Directory Manager': Backup task <datestamp> scheduled to start

The server uses its Crypto Manager configuration to determine how to encrypt the backup archive data. The option is not available for offline back up. If you back up server data offline, plan to protect the files separately.

 Only Enable Necessary Services

The setup process enables DS server connection handlers, enabling at least an administration connection handler. You can choose to disable other connection handlers after setting up the server. For example, if the setup process enables the (cleartext) LDAP connection handler, but only LDAPS or HTTPS is used, then set the LDAP connection handler property to by using the dsconfig set-connection-handler-prop command.

Use the status command to check which connection handlers are enabled.

 Configure Logging Appropriately

By default, DS servers write log messages to files when an error is encountered and when a server is accessed. Access logs tend to be much more intensively updated than error logs. You can also configure debug logging, generally too verbose for continuous use in production, and audit logging, which uses the access log mechanism to record changes. Debug and audit logs are not enabled by default. For details, see "Server Logs" in the Administration Guide.

The default DS server error log levels and log rotation and retention policies are set to prevent the logs from harming performance or filling up the disk while still making it possible to perform basic troubleshooting. If you must set a more verbose error log level or if you must activate debug logging on a production system for more advanced troubleshooting, be aware that extra logging can negatively impact performance and generate large files on heavily used servers. When finished troubleshooting, reset the log configuration for more conservative logging.

The audit log for DS servers is not for security audits. Instead it records changes in LDIF. The audit log is intended to help you as server administrator to diagnose problems in the way applications change directory data. For change notification as a service, use the external change log instead. For details about the external change log, see "Change Notification For Your Applications" in the Administration Guide.

 Reconsider Default Global Access Control

Global ACIs or access policies are defined in the server configuration. Global access settings apply together with ACIs in the user data.

You can set up a server to apply the recommendations in this section by using the setup command option, .

When you set up a server without using the option, default global access control settings allow applications to:

  • Read the root DSE

  • Read server LDAP schema

  • Read directory data anonymously

  • Modify one's own entry

  • Request extended operations and operations with certain controls

For details, see "Default Global ACIs" in the Administration Guide.

If the default global access control settings do not match your requirements, make sure you change them on each server as the server configuration data is not replicated. Global ACIs have the same syntax as ACIs in the directory data. Global access policies are entries in the server configuration. For details about access control settings, see "Configuring Privileges and Access Control" in the Administration Guide.

Default global access control settings can and often do change between releases. Review the release notes when upgrading to a new release. For details, see "Compatibility" in the Release Notes.

Generally it is appropriate to allow anonymous applications to read the root DSE, and to request the StartTLS extended operation over a cleartext connection, even if read access to most directory data requires authorization. The operational attributes on the root DSE indicate the server capabilities, allowing applications to discover interactively how to use the server. The StartTLS extended operation lets an application initiate a secure session starting on a port that does not require encryption.

Authenticated applications should be allowed to read schema operational attributes. LDAP schema operational attributes describe the data stored in the directory. An application that can read schema attributes and check that changes to directory data respect the LDAP schema before sending an update request.

Follow these steps to minimize global ACIs:

  1. Remove existing global ACIs to prevent all access.

    $ dsconfig \ set-access-control-handler-prop \ --hostname www.mkwebhost.com \ --port \ --bindDN "cn=Directory Manager" \ --bindPassword password \ --reset global-aci \ --trustAll \ --no-prompt
  2. Allow limited global access for essential operations.

    This example allows the following limited access:

    • Authenticated users can request the ForgeRock Transaction ID control, which has OID .

      Other components in the ForgeRock platform use this control to share transaction IDs for common access logging.

      If you do not use common access logging, you can skip adding the global ACI for .

    • Anonymous users can request the Get Symmetric Key extended operation, which has OID , and the StartTLS extended operation, which has OID .

      DS servers require Get Symmetric Key extended operation access to create and share secret keys for encryption.

      Directory client applications must be able to use the StartTLS operation to initiate a secure connection with an LDAP connection handler. This must be available to anonymous users so that applications can initiate a secure connection before sending bind credentials to authenticate, for example.

      If the directory deployment does not support StartTLS, then remove from the global ACI for .

    • Anonymous and authenticated users can read information about the LDAP features that DS servers support according to the global ACI named .

      This exposes metadata publicly for the following attributes:

      The base DNs for user data

      Supported storage schemes for pre-encoded passwords

      Supported LDAP controls by OID

      Supported LDAP extended operations by OID

      Supported optional LDAP features by OID

      Supported LDAP versions

      Supported SASL mechanisms

      Supported cipher suites for transport layer security

      Supported protocols for transport layer security

      Name of the LDAP server implementer

      Version of the LDAP server implementation

    $
Источник: [www.mkwebhost.com]
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